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Great day learning about Shipwrecks at our sister center’s archaeology works workshop.

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Exploring Sfax: Thyna, the old roman city; cemeteries and the seaside.

carolscotti:

Thyna, the old roman city

Old Roman Ruins

More ruins

Last ruins, I promise

Hidden in Sfax, the roman ruins in Thyna are a must-see site. Not far from the city center, the ruins offer an experience of history and architecture in the middle of a desert…

I’ve never seen a Muslim cemetery before. Thanks for posting!

Source: carolscotti
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flanthro:

International Archaeology Day Pub Crawl

by Emily Jane Murray, FPAN staff

Archaeotourism is a great way to get folks out and visiting sites. But it doesn’t just have to entail staring at soil stains and building ruins. For International Archaeology Day, the Florida Public Archaeology Network’s Northeast region sponsored a whirlwind tour of four bars and several archaeological sites around St. Augustine. We were always told you could tell the history of this city by which bar you were drinking in…so we did just that! The tour focused on several sites the City of St. Augustine Archaeological program has worked on, the Castillo de San Marcos, a National Park Service Park and Tolomato, a historic cemetery. This was a great way to highlight some of St. Augustine’s great places (archaeological sites, buildings and businesses) and was so successful, we’re sponsoring a second one this year.

Pub crawl for international archaeology day!

Source: flanthro
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flanthro:

International Archaeology Day Pub Crawl

by Emily Jane Murray, FPAN staff

Archaeotourism is a great way to get folks out and visiting sites. But it doesn’t just have to entail staring at soil stains and building ruins. For International Archaeology Day, the Florida Public Archaeology Network’s Northeast region sponsored a whirlwind tour of four bars and several archaeological sites around St. Augustine. We were always told you could tell the history of this city by which bar you were drinking in…so we did just that! The tour focused on several sites the City of St. Augustine Archaeological program has worked on, the Castillo de San Marcos, a National Park Service Park and Tolomato, a historic cemetery. This was a great way to highlight some of St. Augustine’s great places (archaeological sites, buildings and businesses) and was so successful, we’re sponsoring a second one this year.

Archaeology pub crawl!

Source: flanthro
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iowaarchaeology:

We got a behind the scenes tour of the new archaeology lab and curation facility at the State Historical Society of North Dakota this afternoon. North Dakotans are just the nicest! #archaeology #nodak #bison #fauna

I lived in Minot and Bismarck many years- love North Dakota and North Dakota archaeology!

Source: iowaarchaeology
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Spoke up for archaeology yesterday in Daytona. Elliot Plantation, Shiloh family cemetery, Free Black School, numerous prehistoric sites under threat from Space X Launch pad within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. That’s right, WITHIN the refuge.

Photo Set

flanthro:

Sulphur Springs Heritage Research Project—Tampa, Florida USA

By: Antoinette T. Jackson, Ph.D., USF Department of Anthropology

USF Heritage Research Lab—Heritage as a Key Cultural Resource

 

The goal of the Sulphur Springs Heritage Project is to research and document the history, heritage, and associated cultural resources in two Tampa, Florida communities—Sulphur Springs and Spring Hill—and show their impact on the growth and development of the city of Tampa. The project is being conducted in partnership with the Sulphur Springs Museum and Heritage Center Advisory Board and the University of South Florida (USF) Heritage Research Lab. For additional news and information about this project and others go to the USF Heritage Research Lab website.

Project Significance

In the early 1900s Sulphur Springs was the recreational destination of choice for Tampa Bay area residents and northerners alike. Visitors flocked to the natural spring, pool, and arcade—touted as the first indoor mall in the country—for fun and entertainment. There were also movie theaters, carriage rides, trolley cars, schools, stores, churches, and parks for visitors and residents. Sulphur Springs is also the story of the segregated south in America and legal and cultural enforcement of segregation laws along racial lines prevailed starting at the time of the community’s inception and into the mid-1960s. Today effects of policies of racial segregation are reflected in stories people tell when they remember Sulphur Springs and in stories that are left untold in public profiles and records about the history of the community. Specifically, there are many untold stories about the history and daily lives of African Americans and others that lived and worked in Sulphur Springs— many of whom reside in the community known as Spring Hill.

Project Background

The USF Heritage Research Lab was launched in Fall 2006 under the direction of Dr. Antoinette Jackson with the mission of developing applied research projects in collaboration with communities and civic organizations interested in preserving and promoting heritage as a key cultural resource. Graduate student participation in the Sulphur Springs Heritage Project initially began as an applied research assignment in Dr. Jackson’s Fall 2006 “Issues in Heritage Tourism” course. Since then, students, faculty, and other interested parties have continued to join the project team and participate in a range of creative ways. A major aim of the project from an applied perspective is to fill in gaps in the public record and create a comprehensive profile of these communities which can be used for creating tourist brochures, museum and heritage center exhibits, and multi-media materials for educational purposes. It is anticipated that the project can serve as a model for other communities interested in engaging in similar efforts.  Project activities include: a) conducting key consultant interviews with Sulphur Springs and Spring Hill community residents and former residents and others knowledgeable about these communities; b) working with USF library to catalog and house collected oral histories; c) conducting ethnographic and archival research; and d) identifying, collecting, and cataloging artifacts and information of cultural and historical importance to the community. A key strength of the lab is providing students with hands on learning experiences of working in community.

 Engaging Community

There is a relationship between heritage preservation and community identity. The USF Heritage Lab is a resource for communities interested in researching, documenting, and preserving tangible and intangible cultural heritage resources and sharing this knowledge with future generations.

 Image 1: Bathing at Sulphur Springs, Tampa, Fla., circa 1916-1930, Hampton Dunn Collection of Florida Postcards, USF Libraries Digital Collections. Tampa, FL 33620

 Image 2: Sulphur Springs History and Heritage Day Event, 2007. Long-term Spring Hill community resident, Mr. Earl Glymph sharing stories and information with participants. Source: USF Heritage Lab

Great applied project out of USF.

Source: flanthro
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fpannortheast:

This one nearly stumped the chumps today…nearly! Delft, likely Dutch. Agree? Disagree? Discuss….

Oops, that shell edged from Boston snuck in on the upper left. Get outta there!

Source: fpannortheast
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This one nearly stumped the chumps today…nearly! Delft, likely Dutch. Agree? Disagree? Discuss….

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flanthro:

Social Sharing of UWF’s Summer Field Schools

by Jennifer Knutson, UWF Historical Archaeology Graduate Student

Field school blogs and Facebook pages offer a wonderful opportunities to be an armchair archaeologist.  They are also a perfect way to investigate undergraduate and graduate programs for prospective students.  University of West Florida hosts several field schools over the summer, many taking advantage of social media platforms to share their findings with the public.

First, “Colonial Frontiers” by Dr. John Worth, comprises five years of ongoing excavations at San Joseph de Escambe (1741-1762). I readily admit that since I spent 10 weeks excavating at this site in Molina, Florida, it’s my favorite.  Fieldwork also continued this summer at Arcadia Mill also in Milton, Florida. The site was an early 19th century industrial village and sawmill. This year’s excavation focused on the owner’s three-story mansion including a rare Florida basement. The blog is updated by the project manage Adrianne Sams.  Arcadia Mill is managed by the UWF Historic Trust and is open to the public. A third terrestrial example includes UWF Campus Field Survey field school that  shared regular posts via Facebook. Lead by Dr. Ramie Gougeon, they excavated in a variety of contexts this summer, including prehistoric cave sites and 19th century historic sites, both with Phase I and II components. 

In addition to the terrestrial offerings, the University of West Florida has an amazing Maritime Archaeology program for both graduate and undergraduate students! This summer’s underwater excavations, including work on the 1559 Tristan de Luna shipwrecks, were shared via their Facebook page.  among others.

Does your field school have a blog or Facebook page that the FAS Education Committee should post here? Let us know!

Image: Contributor Jen Knutson on the far left with fellow supervisors Katie, Ericha, Jillian, and Melissa.  Also pictured: Dr. Worth, field director Michelle Pigott, and UWF students.

Another #flanthro post highlighting a summer round up of field school outreach.

Source: flanthro