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fpannortheast:

This one nearly stumped the chumps today…nearly! Delft, likely Dutch. Agree? Disagree? Discuss….

Oops, that shell edged from Boston snuck in on the upper left. Get outta there!

Source: fpannortheast
Photo Set

This one nearly stumped the chumps today…nearly! Delft, likely Dutch. Agree? Disagree? Discuss….

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flanthro:

Social Sharing of UWF’s Summer Field Schools

by Jennifer Knutson, UWF Historical Archaeology Graduate Student

Field school blogs and Facebook pages offer a wonderful opportunities to be an armchair archaeologist.  They are also a perfect way to investigate undergraduate and graduate programs for prospective students.  University of West Florida hosts several field schools over the summer, many taking advantage of social media platforms to share their findings with the public.

First, “Colonial Frontiers” by Dr. John Worth, comprises five years of ongoing excavations at San Joseph de Escambe (1741-1762). I readily admit that since I spent 10 weeks excavating at this site in Molina, Florida, it’s my favorite.  Fieldwork also continued this summer at Arcadia Mill also in Milton, Florida. The site was an early 19th century industrial village and sawmill. This year’s excavation focused on the owner’s three-story mansion including a rare Florida basement. The blog is updated by the project manage Adrianne Sams.  Arcadia Mill is managed by the UWF Historic Trust and is open to the public. A third terrestrial example includes UWF Campus Field Survey field school that  shared regular posts via Facebook. Lead by Dr. Ramie Gougeon, they excavated in a variety of contexts this summer, including prehistoric cave sites and 19th century historic sites, both with Phase I and II components. 

In addition to the terrestrial offerings, the University of West Florida has an amazing Maritime Archaeology program for both graduate and undergraduate students! This summer’s underwater excavations, including work on the 1559 Tristan de Luna shipwrecks, were shared via their Facebook page.  among others.

Does your field school have a blog or Facebook page that the FAS Education Committee should post here? Let us know!

Image: Contributor Jen Knutson on the far left with fellow supervisors Katie, Ericha, Jillian, and Melissa.  Also pictured: Dr. Worth, field director Michelle Pigott, and UWF students.

Another #flanthro post highlighting a summer round up of field school outreach.

Source: flanthro
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Boy finds 10,000-year-old arrowhead on beach

flanthro:

archaeologicalnews:

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BEACH HAVEN, N.J. (AP) - A boy playing on a New Jersey beach has unearthed a 10,000-year-old arrowhead possibly used by ancient Native Americans to spear fish or hunt mastodon.

Ten-year-old Noah Cordle and his family were vacationing on the Long Beach Island last week when he found it at the…

Very cool!  Important he reported it so we can all share in this amazing find.  Way to go!

Well done young Noah!

Source: archaeologicalnews
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Last night of our summer archaeology book club! Tatham Mound, Voyage Long and Strange, and Killing Mr. Watson.

What should we read next year?

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It may not look exciting, but our Project Archaeology: Investigating a Lighthouse Keeper’s House took 1st place in the Community Education small matching grant panel hearing yesterday! Look for more lighthouses and archaeology posts as we put the curriculum altogether starting next summer.

Now, to pick one of the historic 40 to focus on….

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flanthro:

Timucuan Technology Day at Burns SciTech

By Sarah Miller, Florida Public Archaeology Network

Every March is Florida Archaeology Month (FAM) and to celebrate staff from the Northeast/East Central offices of the Florida Public Archaeology Network kicked off in 2014 with a day-long event at Burns SciTech STEM Public Charter School in Oak Hill, Volusia County.  While we often visit schools and train teachers to use our Timucuan Technology materials (biotechnology lessons for middle school students), this was the first time we trained the students to run the activity stations.  We provided information and training for the junior docents and and AAUW volunteers.  On the day of the event all students from K-8 rotated through pyrotechnology, ceramics, thatching, and cordage stations.  The junior docents  prompted students to explore how prehistoric Timucuan Indians adapted to Florida’s natural environment by applying STEM principles (science, technology, engineering, and math).  The event was supported by the local school district, Museum of Arts and Sciences (MOAS) and American Association of University Women in Daytona.   

Source: flanthro
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flanthro:

Survey of the Galilee Cemetery: Community, Race, Commemoration

by Uzi Baram

Combining experiential learning and community service learning, the Survey of the Galilee Cemetery: Community, Race, Commemoration was part of a New College Public Archaeology Lab (NCPAL) program in civic engagement in Sarasota, Florida. Ever since James Deetz seriated the motifs on the grave stones of New England, historical archaeologists have used cemeteries for experiential studies of material culture. While studying cemeteries for their material histories, the challenges faced by burial grounds have become clear; recently newspaper stories across the United States note that community-based cemeteries face a crisis of maintenance as an older generation that cared for the grounds pass on. Through NCPAL, dozens of college students contributed to historic preservation in Sarasota.

Sarasota’s history is marked by segregation. In 1905 land was sold land to the trustees of a “colored cemetery” near Overtown, the African-American neighborhood by the downtown, for the Oakland Cemetery (also known as the Woodlawn Cemetery). When African-Americans moved northward, to what is now known as Newtown, the Galilee Cemetery was established and used since the 1930s. In January 2010, the Woodlawn/Galilee Cemeteries Restoration Task Force decided to close the Galilee Cemetery: purchased deeds will be honored but no new plots will be offered. The Task Force partnered with NCPAL Director Uzi Baram to begin the process of historic preservation for the cemetery.

Dozens of New College students volunteered their time and energies to the effort. The Survey of the Galilee Cemetery has three pedagogical layers for the students. The first was to learn the techniques of historic preservation, experiencing the detailed work required in anthropological research. The second explored the challenging issues surrounding the history and legacies of segregation in Sarasota while engaged with community members. The third focused on the materialization of memory, the anthropological concern for material culture, community, and commemoration; through participant-observation, the project became part of the commemoration of the cemetery. By spending uncounted hours in the cemetery recording each and every grave marker, reflecting on the place and its meanings for descendants and other family members of those buried at the Galilee Cemetery, and recognizing the legacies of Race, NCPAL produced a record of the cemetery and encouraged wrestling with the legacies and longer-term social implications of the past for Sarasota. The collaboration with the Task Force encouraged several of the students to bring out the beauty of this forgotten history through photographs, drawings, and academic work; you can see some of their efforts at The Galilee Cemetery: Beauty at a Forgotten Place on YouTube. Professor Baram produced a report, available at local public libraries and online through the City of Sarasota. In May 2013, the City Commission of the City of Sarasota recognized the effort with a commemorative plaque.  

Source: flanthro
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flanthro:

Bringing Archaeology to the State College System

by Brad Biglow, Professor of Anthropology, Florida State College at Jacksonville

Public Archaeology is alive and well in northeast Florida thanks to programs from the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN), the University of North Florida (UNF), and most recently, Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ).  Beginning in 2012, an archaeology course (ANT 2140 World Prehistory and Archaeology) was introduced into the curriculum at the Florida State College at Jacksonville’s South Campus.  As part of the course, something was done that was not seen previously at the junior college level in Northeast Florida…the introduction of a field laboratory component available to enrolled students and interested members of the Jacksonville area community, giving them the opportunity to work on a real archaeological site as they gain experience understanding the field of archaeology.  In addition, students visit historic and prehistoric archaeological sites throughout northeast Florida as they meet professional archaeologists and public employees from the National Park Service, and Florida Park Service who explain the history and context of settlements throughout northeast Florida.  Students learn the proper ways to conduct excavations, from documentation and site forms, to archaeology and the law.  Enrollees can then take this experience to the university or private sector, implementing the skills in STEM careers.

Beginning with the public outcry against anthropology degrees and their usefulness in the State of Florida by Governor Rick Scott (October 2011  http://www.npr.org/2011/10/13/141305593/fla-gov-rick-scott-slams-anthropology-degrees), anthropologists across the state felt that his statements were a gross misrepresentation of the field’s place in an ever-changing global world.  With the upcoming 450th celebration of the founding of the City of St Augustine and the growing international attention coming to the State of Florida, the role of anthropology will be vital to the state’s portrayal, and the State College System is at a unique crossroads for serving the needs of local communities.

Great new blog publishing examples in Florida public anthropology each week!

Source: flanthro
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flanthro:

Timucuan Technology Day at Burns SciTech

By Sarah Miller, Florida Public Archaeology Network

Every March is Florida Archaeology Month (FAM) and to celebrate staff from the Northeast/East Central offices of the Florida Public Archaeology Network kicked off in 2014 with a day-long event at Burns SciTech STEM Public Charter School in Oak Hill, Volusia County.  While we often visit schools and train teachers to use our Timucuan Technology materials (biotechnology lessons for middle school students), this was the first time we trained the students to run the activity stations.  We provided information and training for the junior docents and and AAUW volunteers.  On the day of the event all students from K-8 rotated through pyrotechnology, ceramics, thatching, and cordage stations.  The junior docents  prompted students to explore how prehistoric Timucuan Indians adapted to Florida’s natural environment by applying STEM principles (science, technology, engineering, and math).  The event was supported by the local school district, Museum of Arts and Sciences (MOAS) and American Association of University Women in Daytona.   

Post on #flanthro on one of our #fam projects! #pubarch

Source: flanthro