Posts Tagged: archaeology

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Great day learning about Shipwrecks at our sister center’s archaeology works workshop.

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flanthro:

International Archaeology Day Pub Crawl

by Emily Jane Murray, FPAN staff

Archaeotourism is a great way to get folks out and visiting sites. But it doesn’t just have to entail staring at soil stains and building ruins. For International Archaeology Day, the Florida Public Archaeology Network’s Northeast region sponsored a whirlwind tour of four bars and several archaeological sites around St. Augustine. We were always told you could tell the history of this city by which bar you were drinking in…so we did just that! The tour focused on several sites the City of St. Augustine Archaeological program has worked on, the Castillo de San Marcos, a National Park Service Park and Tolomato, a historic cemetery. This was a great way to highlight some of St. Augustine’s great places (archaeological sites, buildings and businesses) and was so successful, we’re sponsoring a second one this year.

Pub crawl for international archaeology day!

Source: flanthro
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flanthro:

International Archaeology Day Pub Crawl

by Emily Jane Murray, FPAN staff

Archaeotourism is a great way to get folks out and visiting sites. But it doesn’t just have to entail staring at soil stains and building ruins. For International Archaeology Day, the Florida Public Archaeology Network’s Northeast region sponsored a whirlwind tour of four bars and several archaeological sites around St. Augustine. We were always told you could tell the history of this city by which bar you were drinking in…so we did just that! The tour focused on several sites the City of St. Augustine Archaeological program has worked on, the Castillo de San Marcos, a National Park Service Park and Tolomato, a historic cemetery. This was a great way to highlight some of St. Augustine’s great places (archaeological sites, buildings and businesses) and was so successful, we’re sponsoring a second one this year.

Archaeology pub crawl!

Source: flanthro
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iowaarchaeology:

We got a behind the scenes tour of the new archaeology lab and curation facility at the State Historical Society of North Dakota this afternoon. North Dakotans are just the nicest! #archaeology #nodak #bison #fauna

I lived in Minot and Bismarck many years- love North Dakota and North Dakota archaeology!

Source: iowaarchaeology
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Spoke up for archaeology yesterday in Daytona. Elliot Plantation, Shiloh family cemetery, Free Black School, numerous prehistoric sites under threat from Space X Launch pad within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. That’s right, WITHIN the refuge.

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This one nearly stumped the chumps today…nearly! Delft, likely Dutch. Agree? Disagree? Discuss….

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flanthro:

Social Sharing of UWF’s Summer Field Schools

by Jennifer Knutson, UWF Historical Archaeology Graduate Student

Field school blogs and Facebook pages offer a wonderful opportunities to be an armchair archaeologist.  They are also a perfect way to investigate undergraduate and graduate programs for prospective students.  University of West Florida hosts several field schools over the summer, many taking advantage of social media platforms to share their findings with the public.

First, “Colonial Frontiers” by Dr. John Worth, comprises five years of ongoing excavations at San Joseph de Escambe (1741-1762). I readily admit that since I spent 10 weeks excavating at this site in Molina, Florida, it’s my favorite.  Fieldwork also continued this summer at Arcadia Mill also in Milton, Florida. The site was an early 19th century industrial village and sawmill. This year’s excavation focused on the owner’s three-story mansion including a rare Florida basement. The blog is updated by the project manage Adrianne Sams.  Arcadia Mill is managed by the UWF Historic Trust and is open to the public. A third terrestrial example includes UWF Campus Field Survey field school that  shared regular posts via Facebook. Lead by Dr. Ramie Gougeon, they excavated in a variety of contexts this summer, including prehistoric cave sites and 19th century historic sites, both with Phase I and II components. 

In addition to the terrestrial offerings, the University of West Florida has an amazing Maritime Archaeology program for both graduate and undergraduate students! This summer’s underwater excavations, including work on the 1559 Tristan de Luna shipwrecks, were shared via their Facebook page.  among others.

Does your field school have a blog or Facebook page that the FAS Education Committee should post here? Let us know!

Image: Contributor Jen Knutson on the far left with fellow supervisors Katie, Ericha, Jillian, and Melissa.  Also pictured: Dr. Worth, field director Michelle Pigott, and UWF students.

Another #flanthro post highlighting a summer round up of field school outreach.

Source: flanthro
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Last night of our summer archaeology book club! Tatham Mound, Voyage Long and Strange, and Killing Mr. Watson.

What should we read next year?

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It may not look exciting, but our Project Archaeology: Investigating a Lighthouse Keeper’s House took 1st place in the Community Education small matching grant panel hearing yesterday! Look for more lighthouses and archaeology posts as we put the curriculum altogether starting next summer.

Now, to pick one of the historic 40 to focus on….

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flanthro:

Bringing Archaeology to the State College System

by Brad Biglow, Professor of Anthropology, Florida State College at Jacksonville

Public Archaeology is alive and well in northeast Florida thanks to programs from the Florida Public Archaeology Network (FPAN), the University of North Florida (UNF), and most recently, Florida State College at Jacksonville (FSCJ).  Beginning in 2012, an archaeology course (ANT 2140 World Prehistory and Archaeology) was introduced into the curriculum at the Florida State College at Jacksonville’s South Campus.  As part of the course, something was done that was not seen previously at the junior college level in Northeast Florida…the introduction of a field laboratory component available to enrolled students and interested members of the Jacksonville area community, giving them the opportunity to work on a real archaeological site as they gain experience understanding the field of archaeology.  In addition, students visit historic and prehistoric archaeological sites throughout northeast Florida as they meet professional archaeologists and public employees from the National Park Service, and Florida Park Service who explain the history and context of settlements throughout northeast Florida.  Students learn the proper ways to conduct excavations, from documentation and site forms, to archaeology and the law.  Enrollees can then take this experience to the university or private sector, implementing the skills in STEM careers.

Beginning with the public outcry against anthropology degrees and their usefulness in the State of Florida by Governor Rick Scott (October 2011  http://www.npr.org/2011/10/13/141305593/fla-gov-rick-scott-slams-anthropology-degrees), anthropologists across the state felt that his statements were a gross misrepresentation of the field’s place in an ever-changing global world.  With the upcoming 450th celebration of the founding of the City of St Augustine and the growing international attention coming to the State of Florida, the role of anthropology will be vital to the state’s portrayal, and the State College System is at a unique crossroads for serving the needs of local communities.

Great new blog publishing examples in Florida public anthropology each week!

Source: flanthro